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Stitching some Pics together....
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WebParrot
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I took a 20 minute flight at sunset last night.  Stuck the Mini at 100 ft, pointed at the sunset, and took a snapshot every 2 seconds.

I'd like to 'stitch' the images together for a timelapse video.  
Any suggestions on which post production ( and CHEAP ) process I can use?  Please ... no PhotoShop !!

Various searchs here, and on the 'other' Drone Forum haven't been successful ;-)

4-2 13:58
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Akirasho
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Hey!!! You stole my idea!!!!
What kind of output do you  want?  Video?  Picture stack?  Time laspe?
4-2 14:12
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m80116
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I think you need a video editing program. You might want to have a trial of Vegas Movie Studio or the non commercial free version of DaVinci Resolve.

Someone also brought to my attention the free and open source OpenShot video editor.
https://www.openshot.org/
https://www.blackmagicdesign.com/products/davinciresolve/
https://www.vegascreativesoftware.com/us/vegas-movie-studio/

4-2 14:53
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Occams Razor
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I would think you could insert the images into any video editing program and set the duration to 1/30 of a second (for 30fps).  You would need 600 images for a 20 second clip with this approach.  I'm at work now but I'll check my program later.  
4-2 14:57
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Akirasho
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The good thing is the media.  You can save the images for any future use.  I plan a Hyper lapse or time lapse in a video app.  Then, I might try stack focus if the images are worthy!
4-2 15:13
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WebParrot
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Akirasho Posted at 4-2 14:12
Hey!!! You stole my idea!!!!
What kind of output do you  want?  Video?  Picture stack?  Time laspe?

:-)

A sunset timelapse.
4-2 18:46
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WebParrot
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m80116 Posted at 4-2 14:53
I think you need a video editing program. You might want to have a trial of Vegas Movie Studio or the non commercial free version of DaVinci Resolve.

Someone also brought to my attention the free and open source OpenShot video editor.

Gracias!
I'll have a look at all three.  I have Resolve but it's a deep dive to learn!  I may have to relent....
4-2 18:48
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WebParrot
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Occams Razor Posted at 4-2 14:57
I would think you could insert the images into any video editing program and set the duration to 1/30 of a second (for 30fps).  You would need 600 images for a 20 second clip with this approach.  I'm at work now but I'll check my program later.

Thanks.  This first effort is an attempt to learn and determine the best settings.  I have 360 images to stitch.
4-2 18:49
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Akirasho
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WebParrot Posted at 4-2 18:46
:-)

A sunset timelapse.

A seek peak!  I asked the moderators to move this thread, but you can see it here

https://forum.dji.com/thread-211951-1-1.html
4-2 18:52
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WebParrot
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Akirasho Posted at 4-2 18:52
A seek peak!  I asked the moderators to move this thread, but you can see it here

https://forum.dji.com/thread-211951-1-1.html

Thanks... I took a look and commented.  Looks kind of neat... that's a lot if data!
4-2 19:14
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Akirasho
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WebParrot Posted at 4-2 19:14
Thanks... I took a look and commented.  Looks kind of neat... that's a lot if data!

The EXIF data only the first image as a reference  of ISO & Shutter speed.

I'm still going over flight data as the drone "drifted" during the shoot.  I had fingers "pinch" on the sticks and might have input left stick!
4-2 19:27
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BobWinNV
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ffmpeg is what I use and it is free.
4-2 19:44
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jonny007
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Pictures in a sequence look choppy like a bad flip book what we have made at nursery school ;-) Either you mount the mini on a stativ (*omg*) or better make a clip and increase playback speed. Of course you have to pay attention, that you start not too early, because you only have roundabout 25 minutes till battery is low.
Look the video above and compare it with this one



4-2 22:39
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Akirasho
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jonny007 Posted at 4-2 22:39
Pictures in a sequence look choppy like a bad flip book what we have made at nursery school ;-) Either you mount the mini on a stativ (*omg*) or better make a clip and increase playback speed. Of course you have to pay attention, that you start not too early, because you only have roundabout 25 minutes till battery is low.
Look the video above and compare it with this one

Good points.  

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flicker_fusion_threshold

Display frame rate[edit]
Flicker fusion is important in all technologies for presenting moving images, nearly all of which depend on presenting a rapid succession of static images (e.g. the frames in a cinema film, TV show, or a digital video file). If the frame rate falls below the flicker fusion threshold for the given viewing conditions, flicker will be apparent to the observer, and movements of objects on the film will appear jerky. For the purposes of presenting moving images, the human flicker fusion threshold is usually taken between 60 and 90 hertz (Hz), though in certain cases it can be higher by an order of magnitude.[7] In practice, movies are recorded at 24 frames per second and displayed by repeating each frame two or three times for a flicker of 48 or 72 Hz. Standard-definition television operates at 25 or 30 frames per second, or sometimes at 50 or 60 (half-)frames per second through interlacing. High-definition video is displayed at 24, 25, 30, 60 frames per second or higher.
The flicker fusion threshold does not prevent indirect detection of a high frame rate, such as the phantom array effect or wagon wheel effect, as human-visible side effects of a finite frame rate were still seen on an experimental 480 Hz display.[8]
Display refresh rate[edit]
CRT displays usually by default operated at a vertical scan rate of 60 Hz, which often resulted in noticeable flicker. Many systems allowed increasing the rate to higher values such as 72, 75 or 100 Hz to avoid this problem. Most people do not detect flicker above 400 Hz.[9][irrelevant citation] Other display technologies do not flicker noticeably, so the frame rate is less important. LCD flat panels do not seem to flicker at all, as the backlight of the screen operates at a very high frequency of nearly 200 Hz, and each pixel is changed on a scan rather than briefly turning on and then off as in CRT displays. However, the nature of the back-lighting used can induce flicker – LEDs cannot be easily dimmed, and therefore use pulse-width modulation to create the illusion of dimming, and the frequency used can be perceived as flicker by sensitive users.[10][11][12]
Lighting[edit]
Flicker is also important in the field of domestic (alternating current) lighting, where noticeable flicker can be caused by varying electrical loads, and hence can be very disturbing to electric utility customers. Most electricity providers have maximum flicker limits that they try to meet for domestic customers.
Fluorescent lamps using conventional magnetic ballasts flicker at twice the supply frequency. Electronic ballasts do not produce light flicker since the phosphor persistence is longer than a half cycle of the higher operation frequency of 20 kHz. The 100–120 Hz flicker produced by magnetic ballasts is associated with headaches and eyestrain.[13] Individuals with high critical flicker fusion threshold are particularly affected by light from fluorescent fixtures that have magnetic ballasts: their EEG alpha waves are markedly attenuated and they perform office tasks with greater speed and decreased accuracy. The problems are not observed with electronic ballasts.[14] Ordinary people have better reading performance using high-frequency (20–60 kHz) electronic ballasts than magnetic ballasts,[15] although the effect was small except at high contrast ratio.
The flicker of fluorescent lamps, even with magnetic ballasts, is so rapid that it is unlikely to present a hazard to individuals with epilepsy.[16] Early studies suspected a relationship between the flickering of fluorescent lamps with magnetic ballasts and repetitive movement in autistic children.[17] However, these studies had interpretive problems[18] and have not been replicated.
LED lamps generally do not benefit from flicker attenuation through phosphor persistence, the notable exception being white LEDs. Flicker at frequencies as high as 2000 Hz (2 kHz) can be perceived by humans during saccades[19] and frequencies above 3 kHz have been recommended to avoid human biological effects.[20]
Visual phenomena[edit]
In some cases, it is possible to see flicker at rates beyond 2000 Hz (2 kHz) in the case of high-speed eye movements (saccades) or object motion, via the "phantom array" effect.[21][22] Fast-moving flickering objects zooming across view (either by object motion, or by eye motion such as rolling eyes), can cause a dotted or multicolored blur instead of a continuous blur, as if they were multiple objects.[23] Stroboscopes are sometimes used to induce this effect intentionally. Some special effects, such as certain kinds of electronic glowsticks commonly seen at outdoor events, have the appearance of a solid color when motionless but produce a multicolored or dotted blur when waved about in motion. These are typically LED-based glow sticks. The variation of the duty cycle upon the LED(s), results in usage of less power while by the properties of flicker fusion having the direct effect of varying the brightness.[citation needed] When moved, if the frequency of duty cycle of the driven LED(s) is below the flicker fusion threshold timing differences between the on/off state of the LED(s) becomes evident, and the color(s) appear as evenly spaced points in the peripheral vision.
A related phenomenon is the DLP rainbow effect, where different colors are displayed in different places on the screen for the same object due to fast motion.
Flicker[edit]
Flicker is the perception of visual fluctuations in intensity and unsteadiness in the presence of a light stimulus, that is seen by a static observer within a static environment. Flicker that is visible to the human eye will operate at a frequency of up to 80 Hz.[24]
Stroboscopic effect[edit]
The stroboscopic effect is sometimes used to "stop motion" or to study small differences in repetitive motions. The stroboscopic effect refers to the phenomenon that occurs when there is a change in perception of motion, caused by a light stimulus that is seen by a static observer within a dynamic environment. The stroboscopic effect will typically occur within a frequency range between 80 and 2000 Hz,[25] though can go well beyond to 10,000 Hz for a percentage of population.[26]


I will try again at 1 second intervals as well using these images with "better" software to see if that is a factor. FUN!!!
4-2 23:56
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jonny007
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The biggest and decisive problem is that the drone moves a bit between the pictures taken. Even if it is only a few millimeters, it is enough that the animation stutters and wobbles.
4-3 00:55
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Akirasho
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jonny007 Posted at 4-3 00:55
The biggest and decisive problem is that the drone moves a bit between the pictures taken. Even if it is only a few millimeters, it is enough that the animation stutters and wobbles.

I noticed during my flight that the drone did drift 30 meters parallel to the horizon.  I received a Sensor Error at take off (GPS signal weak.  Positioning accuracy affected.  Fly with caution).   15 sats and no stick input.

I only noticed the drift when I looked up!   I was in a tree rich environment with low light so I got lucky (easing her back to my take off clearing  instead of RTH)! I wonder if stabilizing software might help (without adding noise)?  FUN!!
4-3 01:47
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WebParrot
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jonny007 Posted at 4-2 22:39
Pictures in a sequence look choppy like a bad flip book what we have made at nursery school ;-) Either you mount the mini on a stativ (*omg*) or better make a clip and increase playback speed. Of course you have to pay attention, that you start not too early, because you only have roundabout 25 minutes till battery is low.
Look the video above and compare it with this one

Very nicely done.

I've updated my 'old' DaVinci Resolve and will spend some time today.  At a quick glance there's way more tools to smooth transitions from pic to pic than with iMovie.  Looks like rain and wind (out of doors!) today, so I'll have some dedicated screen time.

Turns out the one trick to import is to place all pics in a single folder and import the whole folder as a media project (who knew?).
4-3 04:52
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WebParrot
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Akirasho Posted at 4-3 01:47
I noticed during my flight that the drone did drift 30 meters parallel to the horizon.  I received a Sensor Error at take off (GPS signal weak.  Positioning accuracy affected.  Fly with caution).   15 sats and no stick input.

I only noticed the drift when I looked up!   I was in a tree rich environment with low light so I got lucky (easing her back to my take off clearing  instead of RTH)! I wonder if stabilizing software might help (without adding noise)?  FUN!!

Geez ... that IS one heck of a drift.

Once I got to altitude I switched from P to Cinematic Mode then watched the position ( height & distance ).   If it wandered more than a foot I nudged it 'back in place'.   
4-3 04:57
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