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Dji Osmo Pocket slow motion?
4323 17 1-28 07:17
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realstreetuk
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Hi Guys

My Osmo Pocket has the lasted firmware and when i go into the slow motion option it states 1080p X4,
But when i record slow motion footage and right click and check the details on the  file it says 30fps?
Am i missing something? is it still 120 fps?
Thanks in adavance
1-28 07:17
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Ray-CubeAce
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United Kingdom
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It's recorded at 120fps but plays back at 30fps, hence the slow-motion.
1-28 07:57
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realstreetuk
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Ray-CubeAce Posted at 1-28 07:57
It's recorded at 120fps but plays back at 30fps, hence the slow-motion.

Oh Yes now i understand..(silly me)
Thanks for clearing that up
1-28 08:47
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DJI Tony
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Hi, thanks for the inquiry. Glad that you were able to sort out your query via the help of our valued customer. Please let us know if you have other concerns. Thank you for your support.
1-28 09:09
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Ray-CubeAce
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realstreetuk Posted at 1-28 08:47
Oh Yes now i understand..(silly me)
Thanks for clearing that up

The only silly question is the one you don't ask when you need to know something.
Hindsight is a wonderful thing.
1-28 13:27
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realstreetuk
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Ray-CubeAce Posted at 1-28 13:27
The only silly question is the one you don't ask when you need to know something.
Hindsight is a wonderful thing.

Thanks,
Im In Uk and as you know the osmo pocket has frames 24 25 30 48 50 and 60fps is there any of those that i should or cannot use due to mebeing in europe?
i know when i use the higher frame rates the the movement is cleaner when panning and blurred at lower frame rates which is motion blur used in movies is that correct?
thanks for you time
1-28 13:32
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Ray-CubeAce
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realstreetuk Posted at 1-28 13:32
Thanks,
Im In Uk and as you know the osmo pocket has frames 24 25 30 48 50 and 60fps is there any of those that i should or cannot use due to mebeing in europe?
i know when i use the higher frame rates the the movement is cleaner when panning and blurred at lower frame rates which is motion blur used in movies is that correct?

A lot of people like 24 frames per second for a cinematic feel to their footage. 25 / 50 fps or 30 / 60 fps is really about if you want to show your images on normal TV screens than about using it for the web. I'm based in the UK and until now I have stuck mainly to 30fps second but mainly because it makes my editing between using the Pocket and my DSLR footage easier to edit together. Some frame rates can look unnatural when played back depending on what you want to shoot. watching a drummers hand at 60fps looks weird for instance. The drumsticks almost strobe in action. It's more important to get the exposure times correct per frame than overly worry about frame rates and to choose the correct flicker reduction timing for the frequency of local lighting when shooting indoors. The smoothness of a pan is more important than the speed and the lack of curving the camera around a trajectory takes some getting used to. I may myself switch to using 25fps quite soon for my next project just to have a comparison project to evaluate. Another reason for using a higher frame rate may be to help cope with brighter days to reduce overexposure if you don't have any ND filters to hand. Personally, I use whatever speed I think I need for a given take if it's needed. If not I tend to stick to around 30 to 25fps for most stuff, but it's a choice rather than a discipline for me personally.
1-28 14:04
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realstreetuk
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Ray-CubeAce Posted at 1-28 14:04
A lot of people like 24 frames per second for a cinematic feel to their footage. 25 / 50 fps or 30 / 60 fps is really about if you want to show your images on normal TV screens than about using it for the web. I'm based in the UK and until now I have stuck mainly to 30fps second but mainly because it makes my editing between using the Pocket and my DSLR footage easier to edit together. Some frame rates can look unnatural when played back depending on what you want to shoot. watching a drummers hand at 60fps looks weird for instance. The drumsticks almost strobe in action. It's more important to get the exposure times correct per frame than overly worry about frame rates and to choose the correct flicker reduction timing for the frequency of local lighting when shooting indoors. The smoothness of a pan is more important than the speed and the lack of curving the camera around a trajectory takes some getting used to. I may myself switch to using 25fps quite soon for my next project just to have a comparison project to evaluate. Another reason for using a higher frame rate may be to help cope with brighter days to reduce overexposure if you don't have any ND filters to hand. Personally, I use whatever speed I think I need for a given take if it's needed. If not I tend to stick to around 30 to 25fps for most stuff, but it's a choice rather than a discipline for me personally.

Right I see Thanks again most helpfull
1-28 14:15
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Atomicodex
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Ray-CubeAce Posted at 1-28 14:04
A lot of people like 24 frames per second for a cinematic feel to their footage. 25 / 50 fps or 30 / 60 fps is really about if you want to show your images on normal TV screens than about using it for the web. I'm based in the UK and until now I have stuck mainly to 30fps second but mainly because it makes my editing between using the Pocket and my DSLR footage easier to edit together. Some frame rates can look unnatural when played back depending on what you want to shoot. watching a drummers hand at 60fps looks weird for instance. The drumsticks almost strobe in action. It's more important to get the exposure times correct per frame than overly worry about frame rates and to choose the correct flicker reduction timing for the frequency of local lighting when shooting indoors. The smoothness of a pan is more important than the speed and the lack of curving the camera around a trajectory takes some getting used to. I may myself switch to using 25fps quite soon for my next project just to have a comparison project to evaluate. Another reason for using a higher frame rate may be to help cope with brighter days to reduce overexposure if you don't have any ND filters to hand. Personally, I use whatever speed I think I need for a given take if it's needed. If not I tend to stick to around 30 to 25fps for most stuff, but it's a choice rather than a discipline for me personally.

It's not all about frame rate. Don't forget the 180 degree shutter angle. If you are filming at 30fps your shutter speed should be 1/60. If you have to reduce your shutter speed due to brightness then use an ND filter. This will make your footage a lot better than just letting the camera jump to 1/500 in bright light or 1/10 in low light.
1-29 10:32
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Atomicodex
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Ray-CubeAce Posted at 1-28 14:04
A lot of people like 24 frames per second for a cinematic feel to their footage. 25 / 50 fps or 30 / 60 fps is really about if you want to show your images on normal TV screens than about using it for the web. I'm based in the UK and until now I have stuck mainly to 30fps second but mainly because it makes my editing between using the Pocket and my DSLR footage easier to edit together. Some frame rates can look unnatural when played back depending on what you want to shoot. watching a drummers hand at 60fps looks weird for instance. The drumsticks almost strobe in action. It's more important to get the exposure times correct per frame than overly worry about frame rates and to choose the correct flicker reduction timing for the frequency of local lighting when shooting indoors. The smoothness of a pan is more important than the speed and the lack of curving the camera around a trajectory takes some getting used to. I may myself switch to using 25fps quite soon for my next project just to have a comparison project to evaluate. Another reason for using a higher frame rate may be to help cope with brighter days to reduce overexposure if you don't have any ND filters to hand. Personally, I use whatever speed I think I need for a given take if it's needed. If not I tend to stick to around 30 to 25fps for most stuff, but it's a choice rather than a discipline for me personally.

It's not all about frame rate. Don't forget the 180 degree shutter angle. If you are filming at 30fps your shutter speed should be 1/60. If you have to reduce your shutter speed due to brightness then use an ND filter. This will make your footage a lot better than just letting the camera jump to 1/500 in bright light or 1/10 in low light.
1-29 10:32
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Ray-CubeAce
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Atomicodex Posted at 1-29 10:32
It's not all about frame rate. Don't forget the 180 degree shutter angle. If you are filming at 30fps your shutter speed should be 1/60. If you have to reduce your shutter speed due to brightness then use an ND filter. This will make your footage a lot better than just letting the camera jump to 1/500 in bright light or 1/10 in low light.

Did you miss this part of my reply above?
' and to choose the correct flicker reduction timing for the frequency of local lighting when shooting indoors.'
But thank you for making it clearer than in my reply.
1-29 10:58
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Atomicodex
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Ray-CubeAce Posted at 1-29 10:58
Did you miss this part of my reply above?
' and to choose the correct flicker reduction timing for the frequency of local lighting when shooting indoors.'
But thank you for making it clearer than in my reply.

Hi Ray,

I was not trying to diminish the value of your statement, just adding additional info that folks may find helpful.

With regard to flicker, that is a separate setting. Flicker reduction (or refresh rate) typically relates to whether you are in a 50Hz region such as Europe or a 60Hz region such as the US. It does correlate to fps in that the frame rate will typically be in multiples of the refresh rate.
1-30 10:20
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Ray-CubeAce
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Atomicodex Posted at 1-30 10:20
Hi Ray,

I was not trying to diminish the value of your statement, just adding additional info that folks may find helpful.

I realised that
I'm not sure how the Osmo Pocket sets its anti-flicker, but on my main camera it detects the mains cycle and makes sure the exposure is taken either side of the peak of the mains frequency where the dimming of an incandescent bulb is weakest. I thought the 180 rule was roughly to accomplish the same thing but I'm willing to learn if you have a different explanation as to its use.
1-30 12:29
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fans980d4c5c
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Same for me! I’m waiting for a reply from DJI. Creating major problems in the edit process
7-30 00:46
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fans980d4c5c
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Same for me! I’m waiting for a reply from DJI. Creating major problems in the edit process
7-30 00:48
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djiuser_U6FdNzA9culP
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Turkey
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i'd like to 5x slowmotion 24fps output option.
8-26 22:48
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AmyMarieBorg
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I'll have a look at mine too.  
8-27 03:05
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DJI-Osmo-User-1
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The 180deg rule has nothing to do with flicker but only to give a more natural look where motion is slightly blurred, a very high shutter speed will give you a stuttering effect which is not pleasing to watch. In order to combat flicker from lamps then  you need to manually set shutter speed to double the Hz of the incoming mains. In UK this is 50Hz and America it’s 60Hz, if you double the shutter speed eg. 100 or 200 etc in the UK, 120,240 etc in the US then you will minimise flicker.
A brief physics lesson, the mains supplied voltage is alternating sine wave, meaning it switches on and off 50 times per second (in the UK) hence when a camera is set to say 50fps the camera sees the voltage go on and off hence flicker.

There is also a “Magic” workaround if the footage is shot wrong. In your editing suite of choice duplicate the video and move the top track exactly 1 frame ahead, the set the top track opacity to 50% and the flicker will be gone.

8-27 09:37
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