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Transponder for Phantom 4
3288 10 2016-8-23
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macardo
lvl.4
United States
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Has anyone studying to take their Part 107 exam noticed that a 4096-Code Transponder with encoding altimeter is now required to fly in Class B and C airspace?

Has anyone thought about how to meet this requirement? I did a quick search and these units are quite large...
2016-8-23
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Grizz 1
Second Officer
Flight distance : 120066 ft
United States
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since I wont be flying commercial,  I just will stay away from their airspace, but in your case I don't think a P4 will carry that load.
2016-8-23
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macardo
lvl.4
United States
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Thanks Grizz 1.
I haven't seen a unit that isn't something one dash mounts in an actual aircraft. Have you?
2016-8-24
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mark82
lvl.1
Flight distance : 4459 ft
United States
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It's hard to understand how or why you would be flying in class B or C airspace. If you are close enough to the airport that the airspace extends to the surface you are probably close enough to be in the NFZ and the Phantom won't fly. Not to mention these areas extend to the surface because aircraft make final approach and takeoff through the space. When you are further away, you would need to be flying significantly higher than 400' to enter the space. Do you have a specific place in mind?
2016-8-24
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macardo
lvl.4
United States
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Mark82, I will be flying on the outer edge of a class C airport, but still within the restricted 5 mile zone. I will have radio communication with ATC, and a transponder with encoding altimeter.
It will be an ongoing commercial operation and flown under 100' AGL
2016-8-24
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jmims
Second Officer
Flight distance : 1686991 ft
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United States
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I'm about to do a recurring aerial job at an airport (Class C airspace). Of course, the radio part is easy, but I, too, need a transponder solution. Anyone figured out how to do this without voiding a warranty?
2016-9-28
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MGR57
lvl.3

United States
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From the Pilot's Handbook of Aeronautical Knowledge

Class B Airspace
Class B airspace is generally airspace from the surface to
10,000 feet MSL surrounding the nation’s busiest airports in
terms of airport operations or passenger enplanements. The
configuration of each Class B airspace area is individually
tailored, consists of a surface area and two or more layers
(some Class B airspace areas resemble upside-down wedding
cakes), and is designed to contain all published instrument
procedures once an aircraft enters the airspace. ATC
clearance is required for all aircraft to operate in the area,
and all aircraft that are so cleared receive separation services
within the airspace.
Class C Airspace
Class C airspace is generally airspace from the surface to
4,000 feet above the airport elevation (charted in MSL)
surrounding those airports that have an operational control
tower, are serviced by a radar approach control, and have a
certain number of IFR operations or passenger enplanements.
Although the configuration of each Class C area is
individually tailored, the airspace usually consists of a surface
area with a five NM radius, an outer circle with a ten NM
radius that extends from 1,200 feet to 4,000 feet above the
airport elevation. Each aircraft must establish two-way radio
communications with the ATC facility providing air traffic
services prior to entering the airspace and thereafter must
maintain those communications while within the airspace.
2016-9-29
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MGR57
lvl.3

United States
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From the FAA Web-site for sUAS operators.

Operating Requirements
The small UAS operator manipulating the controls of a drone should always avoid manned aircraft and never operate in a careless or reckless manner. You must keep your drone within sight. Alternatively, if you use First Person View or similar technology, you must have a visual observer always keep your aircraft within unaided sight (for example, no binoculars). However, even if you use a visual observer, you must still keep your unmanned aircraft close enough to be able to see it if something unexpected happens.  Neither you nor a visual observer can be responsible for more than one unmanned aircraft operation at a time.

You can fly during daylight or in twilight (30 minutes before official sunrise to 30 minutes after official sunset, local time) with appropriate anti-collision lighting. Minimum weather visibility is three miles from your control station. The maximum allowable altitude is 400 feet above the ground, and higher if your drone remains within 400 feet of a structure. The maximum speed is 100 mph (87 knots).

You can’t fly a small UAS over anyone who is not directly participating in the operation, not under a covered structure, or not inside a covered stationary vehicle. No operations from a moving vehicle are allowed unless you are flying over a sparsely populated area.

Operations in Class G airspace are allowed without air traffic control permission. Operations in Class B, C, D and E airspace need ATC approval. See Chapter 14 in the Pilot's Handbook (PDF).
2016-9-29
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MGR57
lvl.3

United States
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No mention of transponder.....
2016-9-29
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Warnberg
lvl.3

United States
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Curious, how are you planning on getting (from the air traffic controller) your squawk code and setting it?  And if you transition from one class airspace to another while in the air and the ATC requests a squawk change how are you planning on accomplishing that?
2016-9-29
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DanMiller
lvl.1

United States
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d) ATC authorized deviations. Requests for ATC authorized deviations must be made to the ATC facility having jurisdiction over the concerned airspace within the time periods specified as follows:

3) For operation of an aircraft that is not equipped with a transponder, the request must be made at least one hour before the proposed operation.
2017-10-17
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